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English Muffins were originally eaten by the servants in Victorian England where the family baker would make them from leftover mashed potato, bread and biscuit dough scraps. He would fry the batter on a hot griddle and the light and airy muffins would be given to the servants. Somehow, the aristocratic family managed to taste these muffin wonders, and would then request them for their afternoon tea.
This is not your ordinary English muffin. No, this is a much more luxurious(if you can apply that word to a muffin) rendition of a old standard. The holes were nicely kept while the structure of the crumb was deliciously crisp and chewy but soft. It was enhanced by our own addition of the dried fruit, and thank goodness the recipe only made a few, because we ate these up in a hurry!
As a participant in the breadbaker's challenge, I cannot reprint the recipe, but if you have the book already, you can follow along on pp157-158.
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Mixed together the flour, yeast, salt, milk, water, sugar, and butter

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The dough was kneaded until silky and then allowed to rise until doubled.

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After the initial rise, the dough was portioned out into 6 balls and I took the liberty of adding some dried fruit, and it was then allowed to rise again until almost doubled.

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The doubled buns were then placed on a hot griddle to brown on both sides. The browned muffins finished baking in a 350 degree oven for another 8 minutes or so.

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Can't you just taste it? Think it should be yeastpotted!

 


Comments

04/15/2010 11:36pm

These look delicious! I wonder what fruit you used -- blueberries?

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Sandra
04/16/2010 6:49am

Susan, these were made with a mix of dried blueberries and cranberries, and they came out much tastier than was expected!

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04/16/2010 9:27am

Pure genious! I bet the dried fruit was wonderful in these. I can just taste them all drippy with melted butter, yum!!

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