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I think Italian breads are probably my favorite breads, but I have never had THIS particular bread, and felt like I have been missing out for years. This bread was wonderful beyond words and the fact that traditionally it is made using all wild yeast is my kinda tune. Pane Pugliese bread is the rustic bread that comes from the heel of the boot in Italy, and now I want to visit there just to try the bread personally! Reinhart describes this bread having similarities to ciabatta explains that the difference between the two is the shape: Pugliese bread is usually a round shape. Peter explains that also the use of golden wheat semolina is used extensively in Pugliese bread baking is the real distinction in the nutty taste. If you have the book, follow along on page 222 or if not, try this link.
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I actually used semolina flour since I couldn't find durum wheat in my area. I only used a fourth of a cup since Reinhart recommends using only up to thirty percent of semolina flour.

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This is a very wet dough-- a lot like making ciabatta. The dough will come together after a few rests and risings as indicated by the recipe.

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Here is the dough after the second rise and inside of it's final proofing bowl. Reinhart instructs to proof with the seam side UP so the seamless side will be the final exposed side .

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The final loaf came out really golden in color-- I guess that is from the semolina flour. It was absolutely delicious with a chewy and open interior. The crust was supposed to soften a little after coming out of the oven, but the actual loaf didn't last long enough for us to make any comparisons.
yeastpotted

 
 
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Potatoes and rosemary are two of my favorite ingredients together. So, when I saw that this was the next BBA Challenge bread, I got pretty excited. The rosemary in my garden has also been growing out of control, so at least I could use some of it before throwing most of it away. Peter says that we owe it to the Italians for coming up with this remarkable bread that they call "panmarino", and is a good use for leftover potatoes. Turn to page 219 of the Bread Baker's Apprentice to follow along if you have the book, otherwise, try this link.
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This is another 2 day bread that uses a biga, or "old dough" that has been left in the refrigerator overnight.

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All the ingredients were mixed together the next day until the dough windowpaned.

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Let the dough bulk rise and then deflate gently and form into whatever shape-- I chose simple round boules.

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The finished bread fresh out of the oven. Reinhart suggests letting the bread cool one hour before devouring. But since we were smelling this incredible bread perfume our house, we just couldn't wait.

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Let me tell you, this bread REALLY is as good as it sounds. It is crusty, and the potato addition really made the crumb super soft and chewy. This loaf is high on my list of breads to visit again soon. Another one for yeastspotting.